Ready For Fish

Ready for Fish

Or so I thought

  • Editors Note: This post was updated 04/16/2012 and added a picture of the author’s own 10 gallon tank instead of the stock picture that was there.
  • Whether I was actually ready for fish sort of depends on your particular definition of “ready”. A lot of stuff has happened since I last wrote, I went through many ‘changed my mind’ moments, rethought through things, spent money I needed to, wasted money I shouldn’t have because I was in too much of a rush, and had a couple of humbling moments where I had to stop and admit that I don’t remember as much as I used to know and that I needed to take the time to “relearn”.

    Because relearning things is not beneath me, except in my own selfish pride/ego/whatever.

    My Christmas gift

    One of the things that’s changed is that on Christmas, I was given a 2 Gallon Fluval SPEC Desktop Glass Aquarium

    2 Gallon Fluval Spec Desktop Aquarium

    2 Gallon Fluval Spec Desktop Aquarium

    A closer look at what was inside it at the time:

    Closer look at the Fluval Spec

    Closer look at the Fluval Spec

    The nice thing about the Fluval is that it (like many others) is all built in (minus a heater) and it uses LEDs for lighting.

    I keep mine about 76 degrees Fahrenheit so evaporation happens quickly.

    My mistake

    I replaced both the betta bowl and the fish bowl with a Aqueon 17755 10 Deluxe Kit Aquarium.

    Or at least I would have if I had exercised one iota of sense. No, instead I bought just a tank, then added everything else little by little.

    My 10 Gallon Tank

    My 10 Gallon Tank

    This is what was in my tank.

    What a mistake that was. I should have not been in a rush and just saved up the cash. I still need a hood

    Now the hood I showed you up there is a nice little florescent hood, but I’m thinking about maybe just a glass or plastic cover and a LED light strip like the Marineland LED Aquarium Light

    Anyway, my apologies for making this look more like a sales catalog than a post, but if you need any of that stuff, those are the links that will take you there.

    Like I said, I changed a bunch of stuff around and I’ll tell you about that next time.

    – Jeffery

    It’s a small, small world

    It’s a small, small world

    Or so the song goes, but for my fish tank, it’s gonna be a small world.   “How small?”, you might ask.

    This small

    A 2 gallon fish bowl.  Maybe 2.5 if I fill it all the way to the top.

    This is the bowl that was at the house. Remember, I don’t have an aquarium, stand, test chemicals, etc.  So I’m looking to do an entire setup on very little money.  This fish bowl was generously(?) donated to the cause.  Well okay, I was told I could use it when I asked if I could have it.  That’s pretty close, right?

    What do you keep in a drop of water?

    Crushed dreams mainly.  On a serious note, I started to think of all what I could do with it.  The majority of what I would normally keep pretty much went out the window.  Not daunted by the task, I started giving it some serious thought.

    If you’re new to the hobby, you might be wondering what all the fuss is about.  Well, when it comes to fish tanks, smaller is not better, bigger is.  Often people want to start out small, see how they like it first and then take the plunge.  That’s a great theory, and works for a lot of things, but not fish.

    A bigger tank takes less work and is more forgiving of errors.  Think of it this way: if you put two drops of food coloring in a typical mug of water (about 12 ounces) and two drops of the same food coloring in a 5 gallon bucket of water, which one would you notice the color change in?

    The mug of course.

    For contaminates, or adding too much of a chemical, or temperature change (like in winter when you may lose heat), the small tanks will be affected first, while the larger tanks are buffered against the changes for an extended period of time (in a temperature change) or a much smaller, less costly loss of fish (with contaminates or chemicals).

    Yes, bigger tanks are much more costly to set up and sometimes maintain (depending on what you have in them), but compared to the amount of money you could lose to a mistake, carelessness, or ignorance, the extra buffering power is well worth it.

    That being said, nano reefs (very small reef setups) are fairly popular.  I had one in a 10 gallon tank for a while.  But really, unless you are experienced, you’re better off going as big as you can (within reason of course).

    Not quite what I meant by a ‘nano reef’

    It looks bigger than it is.

    So one of the first things I thought of was, Sea Moneys.  Seriously.  If you’ve never heard of them they are a hybrid brine shrimp that can still be found in some stores with fanciful creatures drawn on the packages that look nothing like brine shrimp, hybrid or not.

    Sparing you the math, for a two gallon aquarium it would take 21.3333 packets of water conditioner (included in the kit).  That’s a whole lot of money for brine shrimp.  They supposedly are larger and live longer than plain old brine shrimp, however….

    In my next post, I’ll see if I can finish catching you up to where I’m actually at in my thoughts.

     

    – Jeffery

    Welcome To Saltwater FishKeeping

    Welcome to my brand spanking new blog (and soon to be forum) on all things related to Saltwater Fish Keeping.  Whether you want to call it a marine tank, saltwater aquarium, whether you keep a reef tank or the good old-fashioned general tank, you are welcome here.

    So come on in, join and share in the fun and information exchange.  Do you have a lot of experience?  Did you make a lot of beginner’s mistakes or learn from someone else’s “oopsies”?  Care to share? We welcome your guest blog post.

    – Old Salt

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