Bubble Tip Anemones

Rainbow Bubble Tip AnemoneThe Bubble Tip Anemone (also known as the BTA or Entacmaea quadricolor) originated from Singapore, Tonga and Fiji and is one of the easiest types of anemone to keep.

Bubble Tip Anemone description

The trunk is typically brown or maroon, but the tips come in a variety of colors, such as brown, green, orange, red, cream, pink, or a delicate rosy hue, and they can grow up to 12 inches in height (30 centimeters).

Lighting and water needs

To keep these anemones alive long term, you need to have high output lighting, such as Very High Output lighting, High Output Lighting, Metal Halide lighting, or even Power Compact Lighting for shallow tanks.

These anemones also prefer a saltwater tank with a higher specific gravity (in the 1.023 – 1.025 range) and thrive in 25° – 28° C temperatures (75° – 82° F). They also prefer live rocks that are off the sand bed floor of the tank to sit on. They may move slowly around the tank to find a comfortable place to sit down but once they settle they are relatively stationary. A minimum of a 30 gallon tank (114 L) is necessary for these sea creatures.

What do Bubble Tip Anemones eat?

As the Bubble Tip Anemone are carnivores, they feed on finely chopped pieces of chopped up seafood (such as shrimp, mussel, krill, or clam) once or twice a week. To feed, simply stick the seafood on the end of a feeding stick or tank tongs and bring it close to the anemone. The anemone should grasp the food and will then consume it.

When you’ve upset your anemone…

There are only a couple reasons for the anemone to become upset. One is if the lighting, food supply, or water temperature becomes inadequate. This will cause the anemone to become sickly and move around in the tank. If there are other anemones or fish in the tank that make the Bubble Tip Anemone feel threatened, it may retaliate by striking at the offender with it’s venomous tentacles. The anemone will then most likely consume the dead sea creature, as it would do in the wild. The stings may cause skin irritations or allergic reactions, so always wear gloves when handling anemones.

Do Bubble Tips need Clownfish?

Clownfish are the most highly favored fish that are kept with an anemone, but you do not need a clownfish to keep an anemone, nor do you need an anemone to keep a clownfish. When a Bubble Tip Anemone is kept in good condition in may live to about 80 years in captivity. Like fish, anemones are a major commitment and although the bubble tip anemone is relatively low maintenance, it still requires effort to survive.

For information regarding further care or answers to problems regarding your anemone, please contact your local aquarium.

Here’s a video of a Rainbow Bubble Tip Anemone that I found on Youtube:

How I Got Started Keeping A Marine Tank

Boy was that some time ago.  A guy I was working with, whose name is Tim  was (and still is as far as I know) really into the hobby.  We were talking about it off and on and I was getting more and more interested in it.

For those of you who read my previous article on how I got into keeping fish in the first place, you know that I had already come into knowing what I was doing the hard way for keeping a tropical freshwater tank.

Now this other guy at work named Scott had a 75 gallon tank from when he had a marine tank and it was sitting there doing nothing.  Having gone through (or was going through, I forget) a divorce, he sold it to me cheap.  I got it, the stand, and accessories for under $100 dollars.  It was the deal of a lifetime and I snatched it up.

I still made mistakes, I still didn’t know a whole lot.  It took forever before I got a protein skimmer. Over time I had a bare bottom tank, then a sand bottomed tank and finally a plenum.  At one point I had a bright blue anemone that was large enough to fill a 10 gallon aquarium all by it’s little lonesome.

Tim told me about a magazine and so I started buying it and reading up on it.  At this point my interest was virtually unstoppable.  I read almost every article in that magazine every time I bought it, I even had a subscription to it at one point.

Over a few years I probably invested $1000 – $2000 dollars into that tank.  $30 here or $40 there before I finally had to give up the hobby.  After I lost my tank (I’ll save that for another post)  I kept a 10 gallon tank (which did very very well) and a small 2 gallon tank that came with a biowheel.

Now I can’t have one at all, sigh.  Anybody interested in posting some pictures of their tanks here?  Seriously, let me know.

Maybe next time I’ll tell you how I lost my 75 gallon tank.  I still cringe.

– Jeffery

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