Why Choose Captive Bred Fish?

A 20,000-gallon tropical reef aquarium

A 20,000-gallon tropical reef aquarium stands along the wall behind the reception counters at The Mirage in Las Vegas, Nevada.
From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository

Although captive-bred fish are often slightly more expensive than wild fish, this can often pay off in the long run. For instance, buying a captive-bred fish means that the fish that would be brought in from the wild to be kept as pets are left in the wild. Because divers bring in fish regularly, the amount of fish in the wild regularly goes down faster than it would naturally. This can cause many species of fish to go extinct when they would have survived if we had left them in the wild and bought captive-bred fish.

Types of wild caught fish and methods of capture

It is mainly saltwater fish that are in danger, as many commercial fish farms breed captive freshwater fish. The fish

are not the only ones in danger, many corals and invert species are also being caught or possibly even destroyed. One of the more popular practices to catch wild fish is called cyanide fishing, and it uses cyanide to suffocate the fish until they pass out. Cyanide can also have harmful effects on the habitat, such as bleaching the coral or even causing death to corals, depending on the amount of cyanide used and the exposure time of the coral to the cyanide. The long-term

effects of the cyanide on the fish that survive this method are unknown.

Advantages of captive-bred fish

Additionally, captive-bred fish have spent their whole lives in an aquarium and are much more accustomed to living in a glass container and are much easier to feed than their wild counterparts. They are also much less aggressive than fish in the wild. Species that are caught in the wild have to go through quite an ordeal to get to the local pet store, which cause many of them to die from stress. Captive-bred fish have a much higher rate of survival since they only have to travel from the local pet store to your aquarium. Wild-caught fish may also have potentially deadly diseases that come from parasites and pathogens that are not found in an aquarium. Captive-bred fish are much more likely to be healthy and disease free as long as they are kept in the proper conditions and are not placed in an aquarium with a diseased fish that was caught in the wild.

In conclusion

Captive-bred fish means that once-wild fish were caught, bred, and then raised under the care of experts in special facilities over generations, although some species can possibly be bred in your aquarium. To see how you can help the spread of captive-bred fish, please contact your local aquarium.

Take Care Of Your Goldfish

Goldfish, Public Domain Photo

Goldfish, Public Domain Photo

Goldfish Quick Care Facts:

Environment: Non-Tropical 20 °C – 22 °C (68 °F – 72 °F)
pH: 6.5-8.25
KH: 70 to 120ppm
Diet: Omnivorous
Breeding: Egg-layer

The budding fish enthusiast usually starts with a goldfish. Such fish are colorful, relatively easy to care for, and are long-lived. Too often, though, they perform their entertaining antics in only a small fish bowl. There are basic care requirements to follow to keep your goldfish healthy, comfortable and happy.

Preparing the Best Environment

While not as delicate as tropical fish, goldfish still have requirements to keep them comfortable. Set up the home aquarium before purchasing the fish. Start-up aquarium kits provide everything needed, including the tank, a hood with light, a power strip, a filter, gravel siphon, thermometer, air stone and tubing. Add ornaments and plants for hiding places, and gravel for the bottom of the tank.

Goldfish need room to swim. A ten gallon tank, for example, would be suitable for only one goldfish. The temperature of the water should be between 65° and 68° F (18° and 20° C).

Feeding Your Goldfish

While goldfish will eat almost anything, it is best to feed them a balanced diet. Commercial goldfish food preparations are ideal. Flake food is preferable as it floats on the surface, making it easier for the fish to find and easier to clean.

Once a day, provide only as much food as the fish will eat in a few minutes and remove any leftover debris. Do this to prevent polluting the tank. A properly fed fish will be livelier, more colorful and more likely to remain healthy.

Breeding Goldfish

It can be difficult to ensure you have both male and female goldfish. Males seem to have thinner concave vents compared to rounder concave vents of females. Try to mimic the mating environment of an outdoor pond by establishing similar temperatures and conditions in the aquarium. It is helpful to make sure there are many plant roots to host eggs in which fry can feed and grow.

Keeping Them Healthy

Keeping a goldfish healthy requires clean and cool water. Regular small water changes and removal of debris is necessary. Be sure the filter is working properly, and water temperature is correct. Keep a close watch on your fish, as it is easier to treat a problem in its early stages. Check internet sites for descriptions and pictures of potential problems. There are many medications available that can quickly treat many of the diseases goldfish are likely to develop.